The War On Professional Attire: How Businesses Are Changing To Cope With The Heat

July 9, 2018

Despite the many businesses adopting more liberal dress codes for their employees, professional business attire is still a staple in many industries across the country. With the long-legged slacks and khakis expected to be worn in the office, it might seem like we have no hope of beating the heat — or do we?

Besides encouraging your employees to take multiple water breaks, there are other ways to keep your staff cool despite summer heat waves.

Some employers have adopted a more lax, seasonal dress code for certain employees. The Society of Human Resource Management allows their employees to dress in jeans or capris if they do not meet with clients. Others, like Triplemint employee Phillip Salem, opt for a dressy pair of designer shorts to keep cool.

“I wear shorts. I like to meet my clients feeling comfortable, not all sweaty as if I am dying from the heat,” Salem told the New York Post.

If your company’s dress code requires long sleeves and pants, you might need to adopt a more summer-friendly policy during a heat wave. Not only will this help your employees productivity when they’re more comfortable, it will also show that you care for the well-being of your employees; apparently 51% of full-time employees claim their productivity is directly affected by stress.

If a company cannot shirk its business attire, then there are other ways to beat the summer heat.

Employees who work in professions with heated machinery often feel overheated on the job. As steam emanated from boilers at a cleaning company in Quincy, IL, employees became all too familiar with rising temperatures in the summer. The system caused temperatures to crest 110 degrees Fahrenheit.

How do they combat the heat? The employers encourage water breaks and light-colored clothing, and they stay on top of their HVAC unit to keep the air from growing stagnant.

Without the proper HVAC system, your company might feel like a furnace, especially if you work with heated machinery. Nearly 30% of the air that moves through your HVAC system can be lost because of improper maintenance: holes, leaks, and misconnected ducts can keep your employees hot without you realizing it.

Perform regular maintenance and inspections on your HVAC system to keep your employees working at peak condition in a comfortable and healthy environment.

For alternative ways to keep your employees cool, consider purchasing spray mist bottles, desk fans, and cooling towels. If all else is out of reach, have bottles of water at the ready for overheating employees.

While your employees are expected to represent your company, it’s your job as their employer to ensure a safe, productive, and temperature-controlled indoor environment. Though the summer heat wave can seem impossible to beat, try these tips to keep your business cool.



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